wretchedoftheearth:

like honestly, I see no benefits in liberal feminism other than it being easier

slutwalks are not empowering to me, my body is inherently considered hypersexual

I don’t even think they help white cis women. If you read comments and groups, you’ll see that a lot of men take them literally and think of them as women on parade for them

And like, to what extent is living outside of the male gaze helpful? The male gaze is impactful because men tend to be more powerful within institutions. I don’t even think that slut walks are outside of the male gaze to be honest

the liberal narrative of “choice” is useless. not all women have access to choices. and even the choices I have access to do not help alleviate my oppression.

I don’t think that any choice I make is meaningful or impactful in ~liberating~ me when men - particularly white cis men - are still largely in control of my access to institutions and the likelihood that I will be subject to violence

bonebleach:

if you seriously cannot tell the different between “i hate the group that i am oppressing” and “i hate the group that is oppressing me” you need to sit down and shut up

"i hate trans people" is not the same as "i hate cis people"

"i hate a group of people so i’m going to kill, rape, judge, and oppress them" is not the same as "wow, i hate the group that continues to kill, rape, judge, and oppress me and people like me" 

For women, the need and desire to nurture each other is not pathological but redemptive, and it is within that knowledge that our real power is rediscovered. It is this real connection which is so feared by a patriarchal world…Interdependency between women is the way to a freedom which allows the I to be, not in order to be used, but in order to be creative. This is a difference between the passive be and the active being.

Audre Lorde

“The Master’s Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master’s House”

(via para-todxs-todo)

angryseawitch:

liberal feminists: “no no feminists aren’t fat hairy and ugly! don’t worry… we totally marginalize and silence the ones that are.”

(Source: stayuglystayangry)


thepeoplesrecord:

Imperialist Feminism: A Historic Review with Deepa Kumar
August 2, 2013

The West has often used the liberation of brown women as an excuse for empire. This talk reviews a few examples and offers some analysis. It begins with the Afghan war but goes back to 19th century colonial narratives in regard to Muslim women.

Source

Men who want to be feminists do not need to be given a space in feminism. They need to take the space they have in society & make it feminist.
Kelley Temple, National Union of Students UK Women’s Officer   (via howkrule)

(Source: marchingstars)

The Women’s Liberation Movement is basically a family quarrel between white women and white men. And on general principles, it’s not good to get involved in family disputes. Outsiders always get shafted when the dust settles. On the other hand I must support some of the goals [equal pay, child-care centers, etc.] …..but if we speak of a liberation movement, as a black woman I view my role from a black perspective —the role of black women is to continue the struggle in concert with black men for the liberation and self-determination of blacks. White power was not created to protect and preserve us as women. Nor can we view ourselves as simply American women. We are black women, and as such we must deal effectively in the black community.

——-Essence Magazine, Editor and Chief, Ida Lewis to Nikki Giovanni, on why black women were not as involved with the Women’s Liberation Movement.

(via howtobeterrell)

REAL FUCKING TALK.

(via so-treu)

Hmm…This is all so very complex.

Ida Lewis is speaking here of racism in the ‘women’s liberation’ movement and  of relating more to the black liberation struggle, but there’s also patriarchy in the black liberation struggle. Black women have always been pressured to put ‘black struggle’ before ‘women’s struggle’, to be ‘black’ before ‘women’, and basically to endure constant betrayal from black men ‘for the sake of all black people’. I’m not saying Ida Lewis is unambiguously towing that line purely from that socialization, but, for this reason and others, I think it’s dangerous to place stratified priorities on these things, as the contradictions don’t allow for it.